Posts tagged with: Nutrition

Truvia Trivia

I recently saw an advertisement in Shape magazine for “truvia” that caught my eye.
“Our new sweetener is born from a leaf, not in a lab. Meet the leaf of the stevia plant. The proud parent of our new natural sweetener. We just give it water. We give it sun. Next, we steep it in a process like making tea. Ultimately, this little leaf gives back a recipe for sweetness that’s both delicious and 0-calorie guilt-free. It’s a miracle of nature, not chemistry. Enjoy. Find it at your grocery store. Find out more at truvia.com.

Being the curious consumer I am, I did a little research.
Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni: an herb in the sunflower family (Asteraceae) which grows in Paraguay & Brazil, up to 300 times sweeter than sugar, stevia has a “negligible effect” on blood glucose, in 1991 the United States banned stevia unless it was listed as supplement.

Truvia: consumer brand of stevia made of erythritol (a sugar alcohol) and Rebiana (cleared as a safe food sweetener), jointly marketed by Cargill and the Coca-Cola company.

What I find truly interesting about truvia sweetener is that a Coke is directly involved in it’s creation and it’s marketing. Might the soda manufacturing companies be taking a hit as people recognize their unhealthy and incredibly addictive drinks? Also, on the website, truvia is clearly classified as a non-organic sweetener.

I have yet to try truvia, but if I see it available, I probably will. I’ve tried many (many!) artificial sweeteners and while I prefer to bake with regular ‘ol cane sugar, I prefer Splenda in my coffee or tea right now. Thankfully I’m not sensitive to artificial sweeteners and so I have plenty of choices to keep my sweet tooth happy!

What other people are saying about truvia:
What To Eat’s Marion Nestle: Cargill’s Truvia (Stevia) comes to tow
WebMD‘s Miranda Hitti: Truvia, Made From Stevia, Being Sold Online and in Certain N.Y. Supermarkets
Baltimore Sun‘s Meredith Cohn: It’s called Truvia: The newest sugar substitute comes from the stevia plant
Ruth from Blisstree Media: New in the Market: Truvia Natural Sweetener
Mark from Mark’s Daily Apple: Is Truvia Safe?

What do you have to say about truvia?


April showers

GOOD MORNING SUNSHINE
Image by ainasa via Flickr

Spring has sprung in many parts of the United States, and for most of us, the weather is warming up, our wardrobes are changing, we’re digging out dusty sunglasses and our toes are sliding back into flip flops. Magazines, books, websites and even television shows are encouraging women to take care of themselves and put themselves as first priority so that as soon as summer hits we’re in the best bikini shape we can be! While I’m going to encourage us to do that, too, I’m throwing in a lot more.

What to expect from Women’s Health in April:
*fitness tips – the season of fewer clothes is right around the corner
*nutrition information – there’s all sorts of new stuff out all the time
*beauty product reviews – if you have recommendations or products you’d like to review, please contact me
*new food/recipe reviews – same review offer as before
*fashion stuff – this is a new territory for me since I”m a jeans & t-shirt girl, but we’ll see what I can pull out for ya’ll!
*interviews with other women’s health advocates – know one? Contact me!

Do you have an idea of what you want to see happening at Women’s Health? My inbox is always open for your suggestions – always!

Be Well,
Sarah

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Doubling the Vitamin D recommendations

Gaby Harari (L) and Joey...
Image by Getty Images via Daylife

Just recently, the vitamin D supplementation for children has been doubled

“The leading children’s medical organization in the United States on Monday announced that it has doubled the amount of vitamin D recommended for infants, children and adolescents.”

Instead of 200 international units (IU), the recommendation has been increased to 400 IU/daily. 400 IU may be the minimum, and could possibly be increased again in the future.

“We know 400 IU a day is safe and prevents rickets,” Greer said. “We don’t have any idea if that amount of vitamin D is enough for other diseases. We also don’t know if anything over 400 is safe” says Dr. Frank Greer, a lead author on the report and chairman of the AAP National Committee on Nutrition.

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