Posts tagged with: Medicine

10 post-surgery realizations

Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, displaying her a...
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As I write this I am 10 days post-surgery. I have all sorts of holes in my body that I did not opt to have put there (technically) and wish that at least one of them had a ring or a bar in it. My nose, soon enough, will have something. Can’t wait to be one-hundred-percent healed!

Realizations about the last ten days include:

1. I have watched more movies than should be legally allowed. Unless you’ve had surgery of course.
2. I missed four full days of work but don’t feel guilty about it.
3. I also have had to leave work early twice this week during healing and don’t feel guilty about that anymore either.
4. Guilt gets me no where.
5. On Wednesday and Thursday I’ve had some “breakthrough” pain that was bad enough to make me gasp and at one point I was in tears. My doc wants me to take my pain meds like I was told. He thinks this could be the problem.
6. I am not Wonder Woman.
7. I am not Super Woman either.
8. I wish I were one or the other. That’d be fun.
9. Asking for help is hard, but worth it. Without it I would probably have torn stitches, still be miserable, and my friends would hate me for not admitting I needed help.
10. I am ready to feel normal again. I am tired of not feeling well, tired of being tired, tired of not being able to exercise and tired of not being me!

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YPFW :: Tree pose

The Tree Pose is also known as Vrksasana (vrik-SHAHS-anna), vrksa meaning tree.

The Tree Pose helps strengthen your thighs, calves, ankles and back. It can also increase the flexibility of hips and groin area. With consistent practice, both your balance and your concentration can be improved. This pose is recommended for women with sciatica and flat feet.

To do the Tree Pose, begin in Tadasana (Mountain Pose). Shift weight slightly onto left foot, keeping inner foot firm to floor, bend right knee. Reach down with right hand and clasp right ankle.

Draw right foot up and place sole against inner left thigh; if possible, press right heel into inner left groin, toes pointing toward floor. Center of pelvis should be directly over left foot. Rest hands on top rim of pelvis. Make sure pelvis is in neutral position, with the top rim parallel to floor.

Lengthen tailbone toward floor. Firmly press right foot sole against inner thigh and resist with outer left leg. Press hands together in Anjali Mudra (AHN-jah-lee MOO-dra). Gaze softly at a fixed point in front on the floor about 4 or 5 feet away. Stay for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Step back to Tadasana (Mountain Pose) with an exhalation and repeat for same length of time with legs reversed.

This is one of my favorite yoga poses ever. It really works my brain because I have to keep myself balanced both physically and mentally!

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Umbilical hernia

A sculpture of a Hindu yogi in the Birla Mandi...
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As you’re reading this right now, I’m either still in surgery for or recovering from an umbilical hernia repair surgery. Not quite the way that I wanted to spend my Tuesday, but it has to be done. The pain was unbearable and annoying and eating only worsened it. People have to eat and most people like to do it without pain. Plus, the hernia-induced bloat made my pants so uncomfortable that this will all be worth it in the end!

I’m having a

Benefits of Minimally Invasive (Laparoscopic) Repair

* shorter operative time
* less pain
* shorter recover period

I’m dealing with a “minimally invasive (laparoscopic) hernia repair” which will then be reinforced with mesh and secured with tacks. Yes, tacks. Gross, right? Three small (well, one is 12mm and the other two are 5mm) incisions will be made, I’ll be filled with carbon dioxide gas, and a camera with a light will be stuck inside me to close and attach the mesh. Ick.

The next few posts have been pre-posted, so hopefully you enjoy the rest of the yoga moves for women! Be well!

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Serious Health Issues

beauty in decay
Image by illryion via Flickr

I am dealing with some serious health issues. I will be having surgery within the next couple of weeks but hope to get back into the swing of blogging normally once I feel more like my regular ‘ol self! Please please be patient and I’ll be home soon!

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Patient, consumer or health activist?

A patient having his blood pressure taken by a...
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My co-worker, posted a thought-provoking entry on the WEGO Health blog asking people to write about whether they were patients, consumers of health activists. What do you think? Are you consumer? Are you a patient? Are you simply a health activist?

I threw my $0.02 in there and would love it if you’d head over and check it out – and add your pennies, too!

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Eye Update

non-spotted ladybug on unknown purple flower, ...
Image by Martin LaBar via Flickr

Remember that twitchy eye?

It’s still twitching.

I’m going on day 25 of twitchiness so I broke down and called my ophthalmologist. Her recommendation? “Calm down, take a break, close your eyes and try to relax.” I thought she was funny, until I realized that she was serious.

I have made a connection to life-situations and rate of eye-twitching, though. When I talk about moving (across the country … happening in late April/early May), it freaks out. When I think about the fact that I have a slight toothache, it freaks out. When I dwell on the intense drama that is occurring at work, it freaks out. My eye twitch is clearly stress related. Too bad I thrive on stress. Looks like I’ll just have to get used to the darned thing.

I should name it.

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New Year’s Resolutions, I

Nicky Lily-Warr...
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In 2004, a friend and I had the crazy idea to make a list of 104 New Years resolutions. Whether tiny or huge, we had to make a list of 104 things we wanted to accomplish in the following 365 days. By the end of the year, there were 14 I hadn’t accomplished. In 2005 we upped the ante to 105 things, and did the same for 2006 and 2007. I was in no place to make a list of 108 things at the end of 2007 (thank you severe depression) and so I made a list of ten. I don’t think I accomplished even five of them. That’s okay, a new year is about to begin. I am going back to the original idea and I’m inviting you to do the same.

Tomorrow I will start listing and sharing my 109 resolutions. They are already posted here at the 109 in 2009 Ning community I created, but I will go into more detail here on this blog on why I want to do them and how I plan on doing them.

If you want, start making your list now and join in on the adventure that 2009 will be!

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Here we go again …

Western Honey ...
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I live with chronic pain.

My pain has had a flare up and I’ve been going to bed early and being so tired in the morning I hardly drag myself out of bed. In the rollercoaster of life with chronic pain, I am at the bottom. That means I can only go up, right?

More soon! I promise! I have GOOD entries on paper that I just don’t have the energy to get onto the laptop!

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Painful realizations

Tylenol 3 - a compound of Tylenol and Codeine

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Six weeks ago I received my rheumatology “first visit questionnaire” and filled it out. Three pages of pretty detailed questions “Considering all the ways in which illnesses and health conditions may affect you at this time, please indicate how you are doing:” (on a scale of 0, very well to 10, very poorly) and shading in “usual pain” areas on a pretty buff male figure (maybe they used Hugh Jackson). Tonight I pulled the paperwork out, as I’ll see the rheumatologist tomorrow and I wanted to double-check the answers. I am concerned.

Tonight I am in a very different place regarding my pain than I was six weeks ago. This week has been particularly hard on me (I hope it’s due to stress and the changes in weather) and so I amended the questionnaire in a different pen than what I used before. I am concerned that there has been such a steep decrease in my functioning in six weeks. I’ve even talked with a friend about allowing the rheumatologist to suggest antidepressants. I know the pain isn’t in my head, but if I can change my head space about the pain, I think that it would lessen. Aleve, Advil and Tylenol do nothing for me. I have prescriptions for Vicodin and for Oxycontin which I’m not comfortable using more than once or twice a week right now, but I might have to change my mindset about that as well.

For those who don’t know, I am a true believer in prayer, and so I have been praying fervently for relief. I am beginning to feel lead to pray for a different mindset about the pain I’m currently in, though. A close friend told me that this pain may be the thorn in my side, it may be the reminder I need to lean on my Maker, my Abba, the One who will heal me the day I meet Him. I think she may be more right than she knows.

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10 Myths of Chronic Pain

{{es|The Doctor. Hermosa panorama de la profes...
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Creative Commons License photo credit: Dawn Ashley

continued from yesterday

Chronic pain myth #6: Patients with chronic pain don’t want to get better because they benefit from their pain.

Chronic pain fact #6: Most people don’t like to hurt. Research shows that very rarely do people exaggerate their pain levels. The benefits (financial compensation or assistance) are often small and not “worth” it.

Chronic pain myth #7: You can ignore chronic pain; it will go away.

Chronic pain fact #7: Ignoring pain does not make it go away and can cause it to increase.

Chronic pain myth #8: Pushing yourself to do things will help you overcome your pain.

Chronic pain fact #8: Chronic pain patients need to know their limits, pace themselves and not push themselves too far. I know that when I push myself, I end up hurting worse than before.

Chronic pain myth #9: If you look young and well, you are.

Chronic pain fact #9: Patients with chronic pain often do as much as they can. Chronic pain is an invisible illness and there are sometimes no outward signs of pain. Just because I look like I’m feeling fine doesn’t mean that; I’m good at hiding my aches.

Chronic pain myth #10: You just “have to live with it” when it comes to chronic pain.

Chronic pain fact #10: There is no need for anyone to live with unbearable pain. There may not be cures available, but there are treatments for most patients. Pain management specialists exist for patients in need. Patients should seek these specialists and find a physician they are comfortable being completely honest with for all of their symptoms.

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