10 Myths of Chronic Pain

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After yesterday’s post about the late Carla Anna, I felt the need to continue sharing about chronic pain.

Chronic pain is diagnosed over time and is normally considered chronic after a patient experiences the discomfort for more than six months. Pain can be diagnosed by neurological exams, nerve tests and diagnostic testing.

Chronic pain myth #1: If the doctor doesn’t find a medical diagnosis it’s all “in their head.”

Chronic pain fact #1: Chronic pain is not “in your head” (you can however have chronic head pain). Chronic pain is a legitimate and treatable medical condition that can be “maintained” by a combo of neurological, psychological and physical patterns.

Chronic pain myth #2: Only weak people seek treatment or complain about their pain.

Chronic pain fact #2: Seeking treatment has nothing to do with being weak or needy. For me, personally, I don’t want to be a burden to my physicians so seeking care for me is an act of strength.

Chronic pain myth #3: Medications for chronic pain (narcotics are often used) lead patients to become addicts.

Chronic pain fact #3: Narcotics aren’t the treatment option for patients with chronic pain. Physical dependence does occur but the majority of patients do not become addicted.

Chronic pain myth #4: Medications used for chronic pain turn people into “zombies.”

Chronic pain fact #4: The side effects of many narcotic pain killers are tolerable, treatable and can fade with time.

Chronic pain myth #5: Medications used for chronic pain need to be continually increased to treat pain due to tolerance.

Chronic pain fact #5: Increases in doses normally occur because of increases in physical (or psychological) pain status.

… to be continued …

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